2018

Tuesday 11th September

Jo Walton

HENRY MOORE: A REVOLUTION IN BRITISH SCULPTURE

Henry Moore is one of the most popular and important British sculptors of the twentieth century, revolutionising the way people thought about the human figure and sculpture, and making beautiful forms that grew out of his love for the landscape. He was often inspired by the art of the past and of other cultures, but he was also at the forefront of modernism – creating a new language of sculpture, full of abstract shapes, holes and magisterial forms. This talk explores his life and works, as well as the vibrant artistic world of mid-twentieth century Britain.

 

Henry_Moore

 

Visitors must book in advance to ensure a place is available   – email membership@ theartssocietygravesend.org.uk

Tuesday 9th October

Leslie Primo

FOREIGNERS IN LONDON: ARTISTS THAT CHANGED BRITISH ART

Why were foreigner painters preferred by the aristocracy in London to native-born English painters, why did foreigners come in the first place, what was their motivation, and what was the impact of foreigners in London on English art and art practise? The lecture will look at the various formats and uses of art, tracing foreign artists from the Tudor period through to the Renaissance and Baroque, looking at their origins and how they came to work in England. It will examine the contributions of artists such as Holbein, Gerrit van Honthorst, Marcus Gheeraerts the younger, Lucas and Susanna Horenbout, Isaac Oliver, Paulus van Somer, van Dyck, Peter Lely, and Rubens. This lecture will look at how these artists influenced the British School of painting and assess their legacy.

Hans Holbein the Younger (German, 1497/1498 - 1543), Edward VI as a Child, probably 1538, oil on panel, Andrew W. Mellon Collection 1937.1.64

 

Visitors must book in advance to ensure a place is available – email membership@ theartssocietygravesend.org.uk

Tuesday 13th November

Joanna Mabbutt

GILDED GLORIES

The art of beating gold leaf and gilding dates back to ancient Egypt. Gold leaf is nearly 500 times thinner than aluminium foil and traditionally craftsmen pounded gold for hours to create sheets thin enough to cover the most finely detailed surfaces. For over 22 centuries from Tutankhamun’s sarcophagus to Rachel Whiteread’s gilded frieze for the Whitechapel Gallery, skilled artisans have exploited paper-thin metal leaf to enrich materials such as wood, metal, marble, leather, paper, glass, porcelain and textiles – even food and drink. Artists and craftsmen have illuminated manuscripts and icons, decorated noble houses from top to bottom, adorned domes inside and out, embellished erotic canvases and gilded chocolate and schnapps. Gold leaf continues to be used as the ultimate faux decoration and dazzling ornamentation.

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Visitors must book in advance to ensure a place is available – email membership@ theartssocietygravesend.org.uk

2019

Tuesday 8th January

Yasha Beresiner

The Fascinating World of Playing Cards

Surprisingly today’s playing cards date back to 1377. Decks from 1475 still survive. The English deck is of French origin and the Company of Makers of Playing Cards was founded in 1628 to protect English makers from French importations. Cards were used as a medium of communication, propaganda or education: the 1678 Titus Oates plot is illustrated on a 52 card deck published at the time and known as The Horrid Popish Plot. Francis Barlow illustrated the cards depicting Marlborough’s Victories in 1707. Modern cards follow in these old traditions with some wonderful collectors’ decks of today.

Visitors must book in advance to ensure a place is available – email membership@ theartssocietygravesend.org.uk

 

Tuesday 12th February

Dr James Taylor

Norman Wilkinson – a Dazzling Career (The Inventor of Dazzle Camouflage)

In 1917 Wilkinson (1878-1971), a first-rate painter and poster designer, invented Dazzle ‘camouflage’. Thousands of British and Allied ships were painted with vivid and violently contrasting patterns of colour to deter U-boat attacks. Discover the life and work of Wilkinson and his Dazzle scheme that continues to inspire art and design. Was it really inspired by Cubism, Futurism and Vorticism?

 

Visitors must book in advance to ensure a place is available – email membership@ theartssocietygravesend.org.uk

 

Tuesday 12th March

Hilary Hope Guise

The Spirit of the Way: The Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela

 

Spiritual and Artistic aspects of the famous pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostella are explored in this lecture.

Visitors must book in advance to ensure a place is available – email membership@ theartssocietygravesend.org.uk

 

Tuesday 9th April

Ian Swankie

Pots and Frocks – The World of Grayson Perry

Widely known for his appearances dressed as his feminine alter ego, Claire, Grayson Perry RA is now a core part of the art establishment. Ten years after winning the Turner Prize he gave the brilliant BBC Reith Lecture in 2013. His works of ceramics, textiles, tapestries and prints are highly sought after. Often controversial, he is able to tackle difficult subjects in a poignant yet witty way. This talk will examine Grayson Perry’s works, his exciting and thought provoking exhibitions, and we’ll look at the character inside the flamboyant frocks.

Visitors must book in advance to ensure a place is available – email membership@ theartssocietygravesend.org.uk

 

Tuesday 14th May

Hilary Williams

The Wallace Collection, The Frick Collection and their connection with Knole

A look at the rich collection of Artworks from the Wallace and Frick collections and their connection with Knole

 

Visitors must book in advance to ensure a place is available – email membership@ theartssocietygravesend.org.uk

Tuesday 11th June

Colin Davies

Zaha Hadid – Architectural Superstar

Dame Zaha Hadid died on March 31 st 2016 at age of 65. Architectural historians of the future will surely recognise her as one of the most important architects of the early 21st century. She was born in Iraq and her reputation was global, but she made Britain her home. This lecture tells the story of her career from the visionary projects of the 1980s, through the years of frustration when her designs were considered unbuildable, to the prolific crop of successful projects built all over the world in the last decade of her life.

 

Visitors must book in advance to ensure a place is available – email membership@ theartssocietygravesend.org.uk

 

Tuesday 2nd July

Sarah Stopford

The Pre-Raphaelites in Their Time

These sumptuous paintings are now among the highlights of nineteenth century British art, but in their day they caused public outrage. In 1848 seven young artists, including Dante Gabriel Rossetti, William Holman Hunt and John Everett Millais, formed a secret society, the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood. Taking their inspiration from early Renaissance painting, they set out to challenge the artistic establishment with a heady mix that combined rebellion, beauty, scientific precision and imaginative grandeur and constituted Britain’s first modern art movement. The Pre-Raphaelite environment was broad, stretching across the fine and decorative arts, responding to a fast-changing religious and political climate, and in its relationship to women practitioners.

Visitors must book in advance to ensure a place is available – email membership@ theartssocietygravesend.org.uk